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Headphone Measurements

Reviewed on: SoundStage! Solo, October 2018

I measured the Elegias using a G.R.A.S. Model 43AG ear/cheek simulator/RA0402 ear simulator, a Clio 10 FW audio analyzer, a laptop computer running TrueRTA software with an M-Audio MobilePre USB audio interface, and a Musical Fidelity V-CAN amp, with an Audio-gd NFB-1AMP used for distortion measurements. On the Model 43AG, I used the new KB5000 anthropomorphic simulated pinna for most measurements, and the original KB0065 pinna for certain other measurements, as noted. These are “flat” measurements; no diffuse-field or free-field compensation curve was employed.

Frequency response

The above chart shows the Elegias’ frequency response measured with the new KB5000 and KB5001 anthropomorphic simulated pinnae. This is the best match I was able to achieve between the left and right channels. They match very closely in the midrange, where it counts most. There is a pretty big difference in the bass, which I have to suspect may be due to the way the earpads seal on the face of the ear/cheek simulator (which has to be turned 180 degrees when doing left-ear measurements), but the bass response you see here was very consistent as I moved the headphones around on the simulator, and I usually get a better match than this. Caveats aside, this is an unusual measurement in that the peak in the 3kHz region (which is generally considered to make headphones sound more like speakers in a room) is very mild, only about 4dB above the response at 500Hz; often, the peak is more like 12dB above the 500Hz response.

Frequency response

This chart shows the Elegias’ right-channel frequency response measured with the old KB0065 pinna (which I’ve used for years) and G.R.A.S.’s new KB5000 pinna, which I recently switched to because it more accurately reflects the structure and pliability of the human ear. This is just for sake of comparison with older measurements of mine.

Frequency response

Here you can see how the Elegias’ tonal balance changes when they’re used with a high-impedance source, such as a cheap laptop or some cheap professional headphone amps. It’s a significant effect; the higher-impedance source produces a broad boost that maxes out at 2.6dB at 90Hz, enough to audibly tilt the tonal balance (and in a way I think would likely be to most people’s taste).

Frequency response

This chart shows the Elegias’ right-channel response compared with two other high-end closed-back headphones (the Audeze LCD-XCs and the MrSpeakers Æon Flows with their two-hole white filter installed), as well as the Sony MDR-7506es, a standard fixture in audio production work that generally conform to the “Harman curve,” shown in research by Harman International to be the preferred over-ear headphone response for most listeners. These measurements use the older KB0065 pinna, because that’s the only measurement I have for the LCD-XCs. You can see how unusually flat the Elegias’ response is here.

Waterfall

The Elegias’ spectral decay (waterfall) chart shows a fairly strong resonance at 3.2kHz, which doesn’t seem to correspond to any particular feature of the frequency response. It’s well-damped, though, and nearly gone after about 5ms.

THD

Measured total harmonic distortion (THD) of the Elegias is almost non-existent above 150Hz, and barely breaches 2% in the bass even at the extremely loud level of 100dBA.

Isolation

In this chart, the external noise level is 85dB SPL, and numbers below that indicate the degree of attenuation of outside sounds. The Elegias’ isolation is very good for a passive closed-back model, generally beating the MrSpeakers Æon Flows and easily beating the smaller NAD Viso HP50s. I threw in the Focal Clear isolation measurement to show the advantage in isolation gained by the closed-back design of the Elegias.

Impedance

The Elegias’ impedance response is typical for closed-back, dynamic-driver headphones, with the impedance generally hovering close to the rated 35 ohms and rising to 57 ohms peak at the 70Hz system resonance. The phase response is fairly flat for large dynamic-driver headphones.

The sensitivity of the Elegias, measured between 300Hz and 3kHz with the leatherette pads using a 1mW signal calculated for 35 ohms impedance, is 102.9dB. That’s quite high for audiophile-oriented headphones, and it should be enough to get loud volumes from almost any source device.

. . . Brent Butterworth
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Reviewed on: SoundStage! Solo, June 2019

I measured the Jade IIs using a G.R.A.S. Model 43AG ear/cheek simulator/RA0402 ear simulator with the KB5000 and KB5001 anthropomorphic simulated pinnae, a Clio 10 FW audio analyzer, and a laptop computer running TrueRTA software with an M-Audio MobilePre USB audio interface. These are “flat” measurements; no diffuse-field or free-field compensation curve was employed. Note that because electrostatic headphones can operate only in conjunction with a dedicated amplifier, I was unable to run my usual sensitivity and impedance tests -- but they’re irrelevant in this case, because you’d probably always use these headphones with this amp.

Frequency response

The above chart shows the Jade IIs’ frequency response. It looks typical of what I’ve measured from other planar (in almost all cases, planar magnetic) headphones, except for the Jade IIs’ bass roll-off below 50Hz and extra-potent peak around 3.3kHz.

Frequency response

This chart shows the Jade IIs’ right-channel response compared with several high-end planar-magnetic headphones, including the HiFiMan HE1000 V2s, the Audeze LCD-Xes, and the Meze Empyreans. All of the planar-magnetic models have deeper bass extension and a less-pronounced peak in the 3kHz region.

Waterfall

The Jade IIs’ spectral decay (waterfall) chart looks typical of most open-back planar headphones, with lots of very high-Q (i.e., narrow) resonances in the range between 2 and 5kHz, and negligible resonance in the bass.

THD

The Jade IIs' distortion is very low at the loud listening level of 90dBA, but unusually high at the extremely loud level of 100dBA. This suggests that the amplifier began clipping; transducers rarely, if ever, show such an abrupt change in distortion behavior. So if you want to crank heavy rock music to extreme levels, these aren’t the headphones for you, but they’ll work for anyone who listens at non-dangerous levels.

Isolation

In this chart, the external noise level is 85dB SPL, and numbers below that indicate the degree of attenuation of outside sounds. The Jade IIs’ isolation is among the poorest I’ve measured, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing, because open-back headphones aren’t supposed to isolate the listener from outside sounds, and that lack of isolation suggests a very lightweight (and, presumably, responsive) diaphragm.

. . . Brent Butterworth
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Reviewed on: SoundStage! Solo, June 2019

Except as noted below, I measured the EN700 Pro earphones using laboratory-grade equipment: a G.R.A.S. Model 43AG ear/cheek simulator/RA0402 ear simulator with KB5000/KB5001 simulated pinnae, and a Clio 10 FW audio analyzer. For isolation measurements, I used a laptop computer running TrueRTA software with an M-Audio MobilePre USB audio interface. The headphones were amplified using a Musical Fidelity V-CAN. These are “flat” measurements; no diffuse-field or free-field compensation curve was employed. If you’d like to learn more about what our measurements mean, click here.

Frequency response

The above chart shows the EN700 Pros’ frequency response with tip 1. Note that this is the first set of earphones I can remember measuring that did not fit into the KB5000 simulated pinna; I had to use the RA0402’s stainless-steel coupler to measure the EN700 Pros. This shouldn’t change the frequency response measurement much, but it does support the fit problems I had with these earphones. Measured in the coupler, the EN700 Pros have a “by the book” frequency response.

Frequency response

Here you can see how the frequency response changes when tip 2 is used. It’s a subtle difference, with about 1dB less treble at 8kHz with tip 2 (which could be perceived as more bass).

Frequency response

This chart shows how the EN700 Pros’ tonal balance changes when they’re used with a high-impedance (75 ohms) source, such as a cheap laptop or some cheap professional headphone amps. Using the higher-impedance source reduces the treble by about 1dB at 3kHz, which will make the EN700 Pros sound slightly warmer.

Frequency response

This chart shows the EN700 Pros’ right-channel response compared with two other earphones in their price range, the Campfire Comets and 1More Quad Drivers. I also included the AKG N5005s, which when used with their reference filter are the earphones said to best conform to the so-called “Harman curve,” the response that research shows delivers the most natural sound. The EN700 Pros look pretty close to the Harman curve, although with slightly less bass and more treble.

Waterfall

The EN700 Pros’ spectral decay (waterfall) chart shows no significant resonances.

THD

The EN700 Pros’ measured total harmonic distortion (THD) is unusual. It doesn’t vary with level -- it’s basically the same at 90dBA and 100dBA. It’s also worse in the mids than in the bass; normally the reverse is true. From about 250Hz to 3kHz, the distortion runs between 2% and 3%. For a transducer, that’s not really all that high, but still, something a little different seems to be going on here.

Isolation

In this chart, the external noise level is 85dB SPL, and numbers below that indicate the degree of attenuation of outside sounds. Isolation of the EN700 Pros (shown with the small tips, which are the ones that best fit the KB5000 pinna) is unremarkable, although if you’re able to get a good fit with these earphones (something I couldn’t really do with the ear/cheek simulator), you may get better blocking of environmental noise than I measured here. For perspective, I included isolation curves of the Campfire Comet earphones (with silicone and foam tips), as well as the Bose QC20 noise-canceling earphones.

Impedance

The impedance magnitude of the EN700s is almost dead flat at 17 ohms (the rated impedance is 16 ohms), with essentially flat phase response.

Sensitivity of the EN700s, measured between 300Hz and 3kHz, using a 1mW signal calculated for 16 ohms rated impedance, is 108.0dB -- quite a bit higher than the rated 101dB. Even measured at the industry standard 500Hz, sensitivity is 105.2dB. You will have no problem getting loud volumes when plugging the EN700s straight into a smartphone or tablet.

. . . Brent Butterworth
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Reviewed on: SoundStage! Solo, May 2019

I measured the E1026BT-I 1More Stylish True Wireless earphones using laboratory-grade equipment: a G.R.A.S. Model 43AG ear/cheek simulator/RA0402 ear simulator with KB5000/KB5001 simulated pinnae, and a Clio 10 FW audio analyzer. For isolation measurements, I used a laptop computer running TrueRTA software with an M-Audio MobilePre USB audio interface. A MEE Audio Connect Bluetooth transmitter was used to send signals from the Clio 10 FW to the earphones. These are “flat” measurements; no diffuse-field or free-field compensation curve was employed. Note that because of the latency introduced by Bluetooth, I wasn’t able to do a spectral decay measurement, and of course my usual impedance and sensitivity measurements are irrelevant for wireless earphones. If you’d like to learn more about what our measurements mean, click here.

Frequency response

The above chart shows the E1026BT-Is’ frequency response measured with the KB5000 and KB5001 anthropomorphic simulated pinnae. This is a fairly normal result for earphones, although we might typically see the traces moved further to the left -- i.e., the bass bump centered closer to 100Hz, and the two treble peaks shifted down by about 1kHz. One note: the latency (which is seen in the impulse measurement used to calculate the frequency response) of these earphones with the MEE Connect is 319ms, the longest I can remember measuring from Bluetooth headphones or earphones. That’s no problem if you’re listening to audio-only material, but it’ll create lip-sync problems with video content and likely make playing certain games feel a little weird.

Frequency response

This chart shows the E1026BT-Is’ right-channel response compared with the Sennheiser Momentum True Wirelesses and the AKG N5005s (the N5005s are the earphones that currently best conform to the “Harman curve,” shown in research by Harman International to be the preferred in-ear headphone response for most listeners).

THD

Because of the latency of the Bluetooth connection, I had to measure distortion the old-fashioned way, with discrete tones instead of a sweep. This chart shows distortion plotted at one-octave intervals. Even though this method is more demanding because the single tone is played continuously at a high level for several seconds per measurement, thus encouraging heat buildup in the driver’s voice coil and the amp, the E1026BT-Is’ distortion remains very low, staying under 2% even at the low frequency of 32Hz and the extremely high level of 100dBA.

Isolation

In this chart, the red line indicates an external noise level of 85dB SPL, and numbers below that indicate the degree of attenuation of outside sounds. The E1026BT-I Stylish True Wirelesses’ isolation is the least of all the earphones included here, probably because they don’t fit as deep in the ear canal as typical passive earphones such as the 1More Quad Drivers and Campfire Comets do, and they’re not as bulky as the Sennheiser Momentum True Wirelesses.

. . . Brent Butterworth
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Reviewed on: SoundStage! Solo, May 2019

I measured the Matrix Cinema ANCs using a G.R.A.S. Model 43AG ear/cheek simulator/RA0402 ear simulator with the KB5000 and KB5001 anthropomorphic simulated pinnae, a Clio 10 FW audio analyzer, a laptop computer running TrueRTA software with an M-Audio MobilePre USB audio interface, and a Musical Fidelity V-CAN amp. For measurements in Bluetooth mode, I used a MEE Audio Connect Bluetooth transmitter to get the signal to the headphones. These are “flat” measurements; no diffuse-field or free-field compensation curve was employed.

Frequency response

The above chart shows the Matrix Cinema ANCs’ frequency response measured in what I expect will be its most-used mode: Bluetooth and noise canceling on, with the Dynamic Music mode selected. This curve is unusual mostly in that it’s tilted toward the treble, and the broad bass/lower-midrange hump below 1kHz will likely give the bass a somewhat boomy quality.

Frequency response

This chart compared the response of the Matrix Cinema ANCs using Bluetooth (with ANC on in Dynamic Music mode) versus using a wired connection with ANC off. As my listening experience suggests, the wired model with the processing off delivers the most balanced frequency-response measurement.

Frequency response

This chart compares the response of the four different CinemaEAR modes, and also shows the response with CinemaEAR bypassed.

Frequency response

This chart compares the response with Bluetooth on in Dynamic Music mode, with noise canceling on and off.

Frequency response

This chart shows the Matrix Cinema ANCs’ right-channel response with Bluetooth and noise canceling on in Dynamic Music mode, compared with other over-ear models (all in Bluetooth mode with noise canceling on). The only anomalous quality of the MEEs is that compared with the other headphones, they have a lot more energy above 5kHz relative to the level of midrange and bass, which should make them sound a little brighter than average.

Waterfall

The Matrix Cinema ANCs’ spectral decay (waterfall) chart -- measured with a wired connection because of Bluetooth’s latency -- is free of significant resonances.

THD

The Matrix Cinema ANCs’ distortion is measured here with a wired connection; the internal amps of the headphones may add some distortion, but my analyzer can’t compensate for Bluetooth’s latency when doing distortion measurements. You can see that the distortion is present but fairly modest at the loud level of 90dBA, hitting about 2.5% at 100Hz and 7% at 20Hz. At the extremely loud level of 100dBA it gets high: 5% at 100Hz and 17% at 20Hz. These levels of distortion may seem scary compared with measured amplifier distortion (which is typically under 0.5%), but distortion in transducers doesn’t seem as noticeable. That said, I did notice some fleeting distortion at times when playing loud, bass-heavy music.

Isolation

In this chart, the external noise level is 85dB SPL, and numbers below that indicate the degree of attenuation of outside sounds. The Matrix Cinema ANCs’ isolation is quite good in the “airplane band” between about 100Hz and 1kHz, reducing noise by an average of 17dB, and delivering surprisingly even noise reduction through this range.

Impedance

The Matrix Cinema ANCs’ impedance response in wired mode is typical for a closed-back, dynamic-driver model, averaging 33 ohms and with essentially flat phase response.

Latency of the Matrix Cinema ANCs used with the MEE Audio Connect transmitter was 34ms, which is typical for headphones using the aptX Low Latency codec. Thus, you will not experience lip-sync problems using them for video or gaming. Sensitivity of the Matrix Cinema ANCs with a wired connection with ANC off, measured between 300Hz and 3kHz using a 1mW signal calculated for the rated 32-ohms impedance is 105.9dB, which will deliver plenty of volume when you plug into an airliner’s inflight entertainment system.

. . . Brent Butterworth
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Reviewed on: SoundStage! Solo, May 2019

I measured the BT One headphones using a G.R.A.S. Model 43AG ear/cheek simulator/RA0402 ear simulator with the KB5000 and KB5001 anthropomorphic simulated pinnae, a Clio 10 FW audio analyzer, a laptop computer running TrueRTA software with an M-Audio MobilePre USB audio interface, and a Musical Fidelity V-CAN amp. For measurements in Bluetooth mode, I used a MEE Audio Connect Bluetooth transmitter to get the signal to the headphones. These are “flat” measurements; no diffuse-field or free-field compensation curve was employed.

Frequency response

The above chart shows the BT Ones’ frequency response measured in Bluetooth mode. This is an unusual result in many ways. The elevated plateau in the bass response from about 25 to 150Hz is reminiscent of the bass bump found in the Harman target curve. The midrange bump centered at 600Hz is extremely unusual; I’m sure I’ve measured a headphone with a similar peak at some point, but I sure can’t remember which one it might have been. The response peak centered at 3.5kHz is a common feature of headphone response, although about 500Hz higher in frequency than I usually expect to see it.

Frequency response

This chart compared the response of the BT Ones using Bluetooth versus using a wired connection. Interestingly, the midrange bump seen in BT mode vanishes in wired mode, and the response looks more typical.

Frequency response

This chart shows the BT Ones’ right-channel response compared with other over-ear models, including the AKG N60NCs (shown with noise canceling on; thes headphones come fairly close to the Harman target curve), the Beyerdynamic Aventho Wirelesses, and the Marshall Mid A.N.C.s (also with noise canceling on). These curves are normalized at 500Hz; if you elevated the BT Ones’ curve by a few dB, it would look a lot more like the others, except for its unusual peak at 600Hz.

Waterfall

The BT Ones’ spectral decay (waterfall) chart looks mostly free of resonances, except for a little bit below 400Hz.

THD

The BT Ones’ distortion is measured here with a wired connection; the internal amps of the BT Ones may add some distortion, but my analyzer can’t compensate for Bluetooth’s latency when doing distortion measurements. You can see that the distortion is a little higher than average, hitting about 2.5% at 100Hz and 3.5% at 20Hz. Surprisingly, the distortion didn’t increase all that much when I went from 90dBA to 100dBA; it rose by an additional 1% on average between 100 and 600Hz. Note that distortion of headphones and speakers is not as audible as distortion of amplifiers, so it’s unlikely you’d notice this distortion unless you had the BT Ones cranked up all the way with bass-heavy material that features a lot of dynamic range compression.

Isolation

In this chart, the external noise level is 85dB SPL, and numbers below that indicate the degree of attenuation of outside sounds. The BT Ones’ isolation doesn’t quite match that of the other on-ear headphones I included on the chart, but for small, non-noise-canceling headphones, it’s OK.

Impedance

The BT Ones’ impedance response in wired mode is close to flat, averaging 37 ohms and with essentially flat phase response.

Latency of the BT Ones used with the MEE Audio Connect transmitter was 34ms, indicating that they include the aptX Low Latency codec, even though it’s not specifically stated on the BT Ones’ webpage. Thus, you will not experience lip-sync problems using them for video or gaming, provided you use a source device that has aptX LL. Sensitivity of the BT Ones with a wired connection, measured between 300Hz and 3kHz using a 1mW signal calculated for the rated 32-ohms impedance, is 109.0dB, so you are sure to get plenty enough volume when you plug into an airliner’s inflight entertainment system.

. . . Brent Butterworth
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Reviewed on: SoundStage! Solo, April 2019

I measured the Empyrean headphones using laboratory-grade equipment: a G.R.A.S. Model 43AG ear/cheek simulator/RA0402 ear simulator with KB5000/KB5001 simulated pinnae, and a Clio 10 FW audio analyzer. For isolation measurements, I used a laptop computer running TrueRTA software with an M-Audio MobilePre USB audio interface. The headphones were amplified using a Musical Fidelity V-CAN and an Audio-gd NFB-1AMP. Except as noted, measurements were made using the leather earpads. These are “flat” measurements; no diffuse-field or free-field compensation curve was employed. If you’d like to learn more about what our measurements mean, click here.

Frequency response

The above chart shows the Empyreans’ frequency response. This is flatter than I usually measure in large, open-back audiophile headphones. We can still see the typical broadband rise in the bass and lower mids, as well as the usual peaks in the 3 and 6kHz regions, but the magnitude of these rises is a few dB less than typical.

Frequency response

Here you can see how the frequency response changes when the velour earpads are used. The velour pads basically provide a broadband reduction of -1 to -4dB below 3kHz, which will make them sound more trebly.

Frequency response

This chart shows how the Empyreans’ tonal balance changes when they’re used with a high-impedance (75 ohms) source, such as a cheap laptop or some cheap professional headphone amps. Using the higher-impedance source produces a change only below 20Hz, which won’t be audible.

Frequency response

This chart shows the Empyreans’ right-channel response compared with two high-end open-back headphones (Audeze LCD-Xes and HiFiMan HE1000 V2s) and one high-end closed-back model (Focal Stellias). Interestingly, the Empyreans’ response is closer to that of the closed-back Stellias than it is to the open-back models.

Waterfall

The Empyreans’ spectral decay (waterfall) chart shows the same hashy, low-level (-40dB) midrange resonance I see in almost all planar-magnetic models (which is apparently caused by sonic reflections between the large, flat driver diaphragm and the flat plate of the ear/cheek simulator), but the lower-frequency resonances seem somewhat better-controlled than in most headphones I’ve measured.

THD

The Empyreans’ measured total harmonic distortion (THD) is nearly zero within the audioband, even at extremely high listening levels.

Isolation

In this chart, the external noise level is 85dB SPL, and numbers below that indicate the degree of attenuation of outside sounds. Isolation of the Empyreans is comparable to that of most other open-back audiophile headphones -- i.e., there isn’t much.

Impedance

The impedance magnitude of the Empyreans is essentially flat at about 31 ohms (the rated impedance is 31.6 ohms), with a tiny rise to 34 ohms centered at 82Hz.

Sensitivity of the Empyrean headphones, measured between 300Hz and 3kHz, using a 1mW signal calculated for 31.6 ohms rated impedance, is 99.1dB -- basically right on the rated 100dB, and sufficient sensitivity to let you get loud volumes when plugging the Empyreans straight into a smartphone or tablet.

. . . Brent Butterworth
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Reviewed on: SoundStage! Solo, March 2019

I measured the AH-D7200s using laboratory-grade equipment: a G.R.A.S. Model 43AG ear/cheek simulator/RA0402 ear simulator with KB5000/KB5001 simulated pinnae, and a Clio 10 FW audio analyzer. For isolation measurements, I used a laptop computer running TrueRTA software with an M-Audio MobilePre USB audio interface. The headphones were powered using a Musical Fidelity V-CAN and an Audio-gd NFB-1AMP. These are “flat” measurements; no diffuse-field or free-field compensation curve was employed. If you’d like to learn more about what our measurements mean, click here.

Frequency response

The above chart shows the AH-D7200s’ frequency response. This is unusual in that there’s little or none of the usual peak centered near 3kHz that we see in almost all headphones. This peak is generally considered necessary to create a reasonable simulation of hearing real speakers in a room. Without such a peak, headphones are unlikely to create a natural sense of space, and are likely to sound dull. Note that these measurements are the ones that were most typical (i.e., roughly average) of numerous measurements taken of each channel with the earcups in slightly different positions on the ear/cheek simulator. In the right channel, I was occasionally able to measure a mild peak of a few dB in the 3kHz range, but in most measurements it didn’t show up. I never got it to appear in the left-channel measurements no matter how I positioned the earcups.

Frequency response

This chart shows how the AH-D7200s’ tonal balance changes when they’re used with a high-impedance (75 ohms) source, such as a cheap laptop or some cheap professional headphone amps. Using the higher-impedance source produces a slight extra kick in the bass -- a boost of about 1dB centered at 30Hz.

Frequency response

This chart shows the AH-D7200s’ right-channel response compared with two other high-end closed-back headphones (Audeze LCD2 Closed-Backs and Bowers & Wilkins P9s) and the Quad ERA-1s, which I consider a semi-open-back (or semi-closed-back, if you prefer) design. While the AH-D7200s are similar in many ways to the Audeze LCD2 Closed-Backs, they have 4 to 8dB less energy between 1.3 and 4kHz.

Waterfall

The AH-D7200s’ spectral decay (waterfall) chart shows practically no resonance at all across the entire audioband. There’s one resonance at 5kHz, but considering that it’s extremely narrow, and that it’s down to -40dB within about 2ms, it’s highly unlikely to be audible.

THD

The AH-D7200s’ measured total harmonic distortion (THD) is near zero above 100Hz at the loud listening level of 90dBA, rising to just 3% at 20Hz. Predictably, there’s more at the crazy-loud level of 100dBA -- 2% at 100Hz, rising to 4% at 50Hz and 8% at 20Hz -- but because the distortion is limited to the bass, the distortion harmonics will be low in pitch and probably won’t be troublesome, especially considering that your ears will be begging for mercy at that listening level, anyway.

Isolation

In this chart, the external noise level is 85dB SPL, and numbers below that indicate the degree of attenuation of outside sounds. Isolation of the AH-D7200s is comparable to that of the other closed-back models shown, and adequate to block most office chatter and light background music.

Impedance

The impedance magnitude of the AH-D7200s is mostly flat at or near the rated 25 ohms, with a small rise to 32 ohms centered at 34Hz. That little rise is why the bass response varies with different source impedances. The impedance phase is very close to flat.

Sensitivity of the AH-D7200s, measured between 300Hz and 3kHz, using a 1mW signal calculated for 25 ohms rated impedance, is 99.7dB. That’s about 5dB below the rated sensitivity, but still sensitive enough that you can get plenty of volume when plugging the AH-D7200s straight into a smartphone or tablet.

. . . Brent Butterworth
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